Jul. 06, 2011
NewsScientific News

Hybrid Optoelectric Manipulation in Microfluidics

  • This graphic illustrates a new technology that combines a laser and electric fields to manipulate fluids and tiny particles such as bacteria, viruses and DNA for a range of potential applications from drug manufacturing to food safety. The technologies could bring innovative sensors and analytical devices for "lab-on-a-chip" applications. (Stuart J. Williams, University of Louisville)This graphic illustrates a new technology that combines a laser and electric fields to manipulate fluids and tiny particles such as bacteria, viruses and DNA for a range of potential applications from drug manufacturing to food safety. The technologies could bring innovative sensors and analytical devices for "lab-on-a-chip" applications. (Stuart J. Williams, University of Louisville)

Researchers are developing new technologies that combine a laser and electric fields to manipulate fluids and tiny particles such as bacteria, viruses and DNA for a range of potential applications, from drug manufacturing to food safety.

The technologies could bring innovative sensors and analytical devices for "lab-on-a-chip" applications, or miniature instruments that perform measurements normally requiring large laboratory equipment, said Steven T. Wereley, a Purdue University professor of mechanical engineering.

The method, called "hybrid optoelectric manipulation in microfluidics," is a potential new tool for applications including medical diagnostics, testing food and water, crime-scene forensics, and pharmaceutical manufacturing.

Read more on this technology in the original publication:
Aloke Kumar, Stuart J. Williams, Han-Sheng Chuang, Nicolas G. Green and Steven T. Wereley: Hybrid opto-electric manipulation in microfluidics-opportunities and challenges. Lab Chip, 2011, 11, 2135-2148

Or at
http://www.purdue.edu/

 

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